Articulate Challenges

Bond, Coupon Bond

A few weeks ago, the ELH Challenge of the week was to create a math game. I was very excited about this one but life got in the way. I also knew I’d be working on this little gem.

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The Task

For those that don’t know, I recently started a position working at the Robert H. Smith School of Business. All day long I get to work with faculty on how to design their courses with the learners in mind. And occasionally I get to make something fun with Storyline!

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One of the classes I am working on is an introductory finance course. The instructor has a coupon bond that she usually uses in class to show students what bonds look like and explain how to value a bond. She wanted to create an online piece that students could complete at home that accomplished this same goal.

The Design

2015-04-22_11-32-20I think it’s pretty obvious that a module on bonds needed to have a James Bond theme. There are lots of great easter eggs and design elements for the Bond fans out there. This is still being worked on but is now at a solid beta version. It’s not a game per se, but I think it’s fun!

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Note that this is geared towards students
minoring in business and this module occurs a few weeks into the class. It assumes some pre-existing knowledge on the part of the student like how to use a financial calculator. If you need help with the answers, you can find them at the bottom of this post.

Click the image below to check it out. Leave a comment to let me know what you think!

(Remember, you can find a cheat sheet below.)

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Please contact me if you need answers for progressing through the demo.

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Free Resources for Online and Blended Learning

This is a bit of a double post with some free resources for all!

First up, I found out this week that an article I submitted for publication – Flipped Learning in the Workplace – was finally published in the Journal of Workplace Learning. You can download the very pretty final version of the article from their site or, if you don’t have access to the journal, you can download a not nearly as pretty copy here.

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Second, the ELH Challenge for this week was to share some images that could be used for eLearning.  I have been thinking about doing this with some of the zillions of pictures I have laying around in my Flickr account.

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So, while hanging out at home during my snow day today I started the process. You can view and download over 100 pictures taken by me during my most recent vacation to Belize, a friend’s wedding in Florida, and Christmas holiday in Louisiana.

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Enjoy and please leave me some feedback if you find the resources useful. Oh, and be sure to check all the other wonderful shared images from this week’s challenge as well!

New Year, New Opportunity, Renewed Template

I’ve been a little quiet lately because, well, winter, but also because I have been in a period of transition.

Starting February 16th I will be the Assistant Director, Instructional Design at the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland. This exciting new opportunity means I have been spending some time wrapping up projects and loose ends at my current position.

As part of that process, I’ve updated some of my old templates from Storyline to Storyline 2. I thought I would share one with you guys today.

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This “Cards Against Humanity” knockoff quiz was created for the very first eLearning Heroes challenge I participated in, about a year ago. Here it is again in all its Storyline 2 glory. You can click on the image above to download it.

If you just want to enjoy the game, or check it out before downloading, you can play the original version.

Storyline 1 users, you can download the original version here.

Enjoy!

Starting the New Year with a Bang!

Now that the exhaustion and constant movement that comes along with the joy of the holidays has subsided, I decided to tackle a couple of old ELH Challenges! This demo takes on two recent ones: interactive charts and graphs and the color of the year.

I took my inspiration from a simple, interactive graph I created recently for a client project. I thought it would be a great template to share and also added an alternative view.

View #1 (the alternate view)

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The first view allows you to choose which sets of data you want to compare.

This slide uses check boxes to toggle a T/F variable for each set a data. The bars a programmed to change to a hidden state if the corresponding variable is changed to ‘false’ and to a normal state if it is changed to ‘true’.

View #2 (the original view)

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The second slide allows you to looks at each set of data more in depth, rather than comparing it to another set. However, you can easily toggle between the sets of data.

In this view, the slider triggers a state change for each bar. As the slider moves, the states for each of the bars change to their corresponding states.

Download the template!

You can check out each of the charts in more depth by playing around with the demo or downloading the template. Enjoy!

Mixing Up the Drag & Drop

It’s the holiday season which means lots of baking in my household. Pies, cakes, bars, cookies… you name it, we make it. With so many treats on my mind, I decided to build a delicious drag and drop demo.

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Baking Basics walks you through the process of making a cupcake batter. It showcases a lot of Storyline features including branching, animations, and a slider. But the icing on the cupcake is a custom built drag and drop interaction that gives feedback based on both where and when you drop an object.

Order in a drag and drop is important if you want the learner to demonstrate knowledge of a process such as baking or, on a more serious note, putting on a biohazard suit.

Mapping Your Route

To add an element of order to your drag and drop it’s helpful to first map out the sequence of events. This is part of my map for this project:

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Adding in Feedback

For each potential misstep, I added in a custom feedback layer. Constructive feedback was created for when an object is dropped on the wrong target or in the wrong order.

I also added subtle feedback for when steps are completed correctly to let the learner know they are on the right track.

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Making Order Matter

Now all you have to do is add in some variables and triggers using your map as a guide.

  • First, I created a True/False variable for each variable listed in the map.
  • Then I created a trigger for each action to change the value of the corresponding variable when complete. This is also where I added in any corresponding conditions.
  • The final step was to trigger feedback layers if an action was completed in the wrong order.

And that’s it! To learn more about creating drag and drops in Storyline (& Storyline2), you can check out this tutorial or post your questions below. And you can click the image below to try your hand at making some vanilla cupcakes.

Happy baking!

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Building a Digital Magazine

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This week’s ELH Challenge was to create a digital learning magazine. I was excited about this for a few reasons, but mainly because I had wanted to mock up something similar to this for a while now to show as a sample of how interactive documents can be created pretty easily with Storyline.

The Concept

I am not sure where this concept came from, but I decided to create a magazine that could be used to help introduce new hires to a company and also double as a nice informative piece for current staff.

I decided to mock this up as if it could be used for my office. The company I work for does a lot of work with USAID so I chose “Water” as the issue topic, probably because I was thirsty, and gained some inspiration for the fake articles from USAID and The Water Project.

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The Build

Since this was an “internal” company magazine, I kept the style pretty traditional. I used some magazines that I had on hand for layout inspiration – National Geographic and ASTD’s td magazine – and was able to find some really great pictures for free on Pixabay. I used a combination of three fairly simple fonts: Adobe Garamond Pro (large headlines), Century Gothic (secondary headlines and the header), and Palatino Linotype (body text).

When I thought of the concept, I immediately had some ideas of what I wanted to include, like Meet the Team, Q&A, and a Resources section.  I felt like these topics would do well in a “learning magazine” format where some quick information could be presented on the page in an easy to read format and layers, downloads, and links could be used to give the user more information as wanted/needed.

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Meet the Team makes good use of layers and the Resources section has some “downloads” and a layer that enlarges the floor plan image. (This is actually the floor plan for Graceland!).

The Q&A was the last slide I built so it isn’t as interactive but includes some fake links that in theory could take you to forms or information on a company intranet. I also had an idea to build out the Q&A as a list of questions that you could click on to see the answers, but it was may more fun to create this as a Dear Abby-esque set up.

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The articles on water each have some layers that include additional information. In a way these layers act like the sidebars in a traditional magazine layout. But one of the cool things about having a digital format is that you can also include videos.  Be sure to check out the Health H2O article to see the video I included.

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In order to navigate through the magazine you have 2 choices.  You can use the turned up page corners at the bottom or click the arrow at the top to “pull down” the menu page.

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An Extra Special Extra
For the first time I decided to try my hand at using a texture for the page background. This isn’t tough to do but does require fiddling with the html code once the project is published. David Anderson created a great screencast on how to do this. And I pulled my background texture from the wonderful Subtle Patterns site.

2014-11-11_13-50-23Check it Out!

Click on any image above to view the demo or go ahead and download the source file.

And leave a comment below to let me know what you think!